SOLVED: Check Engine Light came on - code reader read out

Detail: Error codes P0442,P0507,P0455 and No DTC codes were read out on code reader at Auto Zone today - what do they mean and what do I have to repair to get the check engine light to turn off
Detail Question SOLVED: Check Engine Light came on - code reader read out

Solution: Make sure your lighter fuse is not blown. sound funny but thats a common prolbem on chevys , Hi, a 6ya Mechanic can help you resolve that issue over the phone in a minute or two. Best thing about this new service is that you are never placed on hold and get to talk to real repair professionals here in the US. click here to Talk to a Mechanic (only for users in the US for now) and get all the help you need. Goodluck! , These codes indicate a leak(s) in the fuel system, it can be anywhere, you will have to crawl under and try and see where the leak is, you will need a scanner to turn off the light after repairing the leak(s) , Yes, the P1684 on the Chrysler line does not indicate a fault. My sebring had codes p0442 and p0456 both indicating very small evep leaks. When I did the 3 time switch on of the ignition, the odometer readout gave me the p1684 first and then the other two. The scanner at the garage only indicated two "very small evap leaks" one for the second two codes. Clearly the first is a status indicator such as recent battery disconnect or another non problematic indicator. Wouldn't it be great if these manufacturers at least gave you the information to identify what their dummy lights are telling you so you didn't have to go on faith at the garage? , hello po442 ,po455,po456 is leak detected possible, check the gas cap , basicaly you have a leak that is larger than 0.020' and smaller than 0.040' in the gas evaporative system use your nose to find this one thanks , Hello shoretex...Yes sir you can repair this yourself... p0442 is medium leak detected ...p0456 is small leak....and p0440 is a general evap system failure.. evap codes are a common thing. gas caps are an inexpensive place to start. There are two types of evap hoses on the Dodge... hard plastic and soft rubber.... before you replace parts check the soft rubber first at the evap cans and pump located about a foot in front of the gas tank fill pipe on trucks located next to the transfer case or right behind the trans on the driver side. hard plastic lines will brake or rub through...check spots where lines come in contact with anything. this is a common thing with older trucks...hair line cracks will kick a p0442 code, and a p0445 code...When you find a leak, repair it, and rescan...sometimes there are several leaks, continue with inspection and repairs until you get it all fixed up.... Remember..start at simple and work from there... i will post the evap. system in more detail to help you troubleshoot the problem. EVAP System: The Evaporative Emission (EVAP) Control system used on all vehicles is the charcoal canister storage method. This method transfers fuel vapor from the fuel tank to an activated carbon (charcoal) storage device (canister) to hold the vapors when the vehicle is not operating. When the engine is operating, the fuel vapor is purged from the carbon element by intake air flow and consumed in the normal combustion process. The evaporative system includes the following components: *Fuel tank *Evaporative emission canister vent solenoid *Fuel tank pressure sensor *Fuel pipes and hoses *Vapor lines *Fuel cap *Evaporative emission canister *Purge lines *Purge valve solenoid EVAP System Operation: The EVAP purge solenoid valve allows manifold vacuum to purge the canister. The Powertrain Control Module (PCM) supplies a ground to energize the EVAP purge solenoid valve (purge on). The EVAP purge solenoid control is Pulse Width Modulated (PWM) or turned on and off several times a second. The EVAP canister purge PWM duty cycle varies according to the operating conditions determined by the mass air flow, the fuel trim, the engine coolant temperature, and the intake air temperature. For certain EVAP tests, the diagnostic will be disabled if the TP angle increases to above 75% . The evaporative leak detection diagnostic strategy is based on applying vacuum to the EVAP system and monitoring for vacuum decay. The fuel level sensor input to the PCM is used to determine if the fuel level in the tank is correct to run the EVAP diagnostic tests. To ensure sufficient volume in the tank to begin the various diagnostic tests, the fuel level must be between 15% and 85% . The PCM monitors the fuel tank pressure/vacuum level via the fuel tank pressure sensor input. Results of Incorrect Operation: Poor idle, stalling and poor driveability can be caused by the following: *Malfunctioning purge solenoid. *Damaged canister. *Hoses/lines split, cracked and/or not connected properly. Evidence of fuel loss or fuel vapor odor can be caused by the following: *Liquid fuel leaking from the fuel lines *Cracked or damaged canister *Inoperative canister control valve Vacuum hoses that are: *Disconnected *Mis-routed *Kinked *Deteriorated *Damaged The evaporative leak detection diagnostic strategy is based on applying vacuum to the EVAP system and monitoring vacuum decay. The PCM monitors vacuum level via the fuel tank pressure sensor input. At an appropriate time, the EVAP purge solenoid and the EVAP vent solenoid are turned on, allowing engine vacuum to draw a small vacuum on the entire evaporative emission system. After the desired vacuum level has been achieved, the EVAP purge solenoid is turned off, sealing the system. A leak is detected by monitoring for a decrease in vacuum level over a given time period, all other variables remaining constant. A small leak in the system causes DTC P0442 to be set. If the desired vacuum level cannot be achieved in the test described above, a large leak or a faulty EVAP purge solenoid is indicated. This can be caused by the following conditions: *Disconnected or faulty fuel tank pressure sensor. *Missing or faulty fuel cap. *Disconnected, damaged, pinched, or blocked EVAP purge line. *Disconnected or damaged EVAP vent hose. *Disconnected, damaged, pinched, or blocked fuel tank vapor line. *Disconnected or faulty EVAP canister solenoid. *Disconnected or faulty EVAP vent solenoid. *Open ignition feed circuit to the EVAP vent or purge solenoid. *Damaged EVAP canister. Any of the above conditions sets DTC P0440. A restricted or blocked EVAP canister vent path is detected by drawing vacuum into the EVAP system. The PCM turns off the EVAP vent solenoid and the EVAP purge solenoid (EVAP vent solenoid Open, EVAP purge PWM 0% ). The PCM monitors the fuel tank pressure sensor input. With the EVAP vent solenoid open, any vacuum in the system should decrease quickly unless the vent is blocked. A blockage is caused by the following conditions: *Faulty EVAP vent solenoid (stuck closed). *Plugged, kinked, or pinched vent hose. *Shorted EVAP vent solenoid driver circuit. *Plugged evaporative canister. Good luck shoretex, hope this helps...please take time to rate me a fixya. , The EGR valve helps your car more efficiently and completely burn fuel by recirculating a portion of your exhaust and running it through the combustion process again. When the EGR valve goes bad, it must be replaced. The EGR valve, or Exhaust Gas Recirculation valve, is a vacuum controlled valve which allows a specific amount of your exhaust back into the intake manifold. This exhaust mixes with the intake air and actually cools the combustion process. Cooler is always better inside your engine. The exhaust your EGR valve recirculates also prevents the formation of Nitrogen related gases. These are referred to as NOX emissions, and are a common cause for failing emissions testing. Unfortunately, your EGR valve can get stuck, causing NOX gases to build up. You'll know if your EGR valve is stuck or malfunctioning because your car will experience symptoms like rough idle and bucking on acceleration. Here is a picture of where the EGR Valve is located (Accord 1999). Replacing it is fairly simple and straightforward. A vacuum line and a couple of bolts. You'll see what you have to do when you look at it. If you are replacing the EGR Valve due to the Check Engine Light (MIL) being on with a DTC P0401 then I suggest contacting your Honda Dealer. There was a Product Update Campaign (PUD) in the fall of 1999 that corrected the problem. Another times, the clean is the solution...I hope help yoiu with this. Good luck, and remember rated this help.

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